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Adoptee Blogs and Websites

Every adoptee’s adoption story is unique, which for some, can feel alienating or as if others can’t understand how they feel. Many adoptees crave connection, understanding and a sense of community with those who have been touched by adoption. Blogging and reading adoption blogs by adoptees can be ways that some achieve this.

Adoptee blogs give adopted adults of all backgrounds a safe place to share their stories, thoughts, feelings, resources and questions with one another as well as with the larger adoption community. Writing is often a therapeutic experience, so for many adoptees, and the blogging format gives them a way to voice their personal experiences — the good, the bad and everything in between.

Birth and adoptive parents can learn a lot from reading adoption blogs by adoptees as well, gaining a glimpse into different perspectives on adoption experiences. In fact, exploring different adoptee perspectives can give birth and adoptive families a way to better connect with their children, strengthen their relationships and improve communication.

Even if you haven’t been directly affected by adoption, reading adoptee blogs can educate anyone about the joy and loss that many adoptees experience. The stories that adoptees share in their adoption blogs are captivating, even if you don’t have a personal connection to adoption.

Here are a few great adoptee blogs to explore:

  • The Adopted Life chronicles the journey of Angela Tucker, a transracial adoptee, as she reunites with her birth mother in the documentary CLOSURE and sets out on adoptee-focused initiatives.
  • Harlow’s Monkey, written by South Korean adoptee Jae Ran Kim, explores her experiences growing up in a transracial adoptive family.
  • An Adopted Kid, where an adult adoptee reunited with her birth family writes about her life.
  • A Chinese Adoptee’s Journey, where an adult international adoptee shares her feelings on the ways in which adoption has affected her both for better and worse.
  • Heart, Mind & Seoul, is an adoptee blog in which a Korean adoptee and adoptive parent named Paula shares her unique perspectives from two sides of the adoption triad, and the pain and joys of each role.
  • I Am Adopted is the adoptee blog of Jessenia Arias, who is an adult adoptee with 10 years of experience advocating for adoptees, and more than five years of experience teaching adoptive parents how to have successful relationships with their adopted children.
  • Each Day Brings a New Adventure, where an adoptee who is also an adoptive mom reflects on her daily life and how adoption has affected her and her family.
  • Mom On A Mission is an adoptee blog of a mom/adoptee who is trying to figure out the best way to go about maintaining an open adoption while keeping her son’s best interests at heart.
  • John Raible Online, where Dr. John Rablie, a transracial adoptee and an adoptive parent, examines issues in race, adoption and social justice.
  • May I Have a Word? Liberty Hultberg is a biracial adoptee who centers much of her blog around hair and what it means in the context of race, culture, history and adoption.
  • The Declassified Adoptee, where Amanda Woolston, an adoptee and social worker who assists children and families in the adoption and foster care communities, dissects adoption and intersecting social justice issues.
  • Adoptee Searching for Self is the blog of Liz Story, an adoptee who is helping fellow adoptees to find peace within themselves and live positive lives as she recounts experiences like reuniting with her birth mother, donating a kidney to her biological aunt and more.
  • Stephanie Drenka is a Korean transracial adoptee whose blog breaks down racial, cultural and social experiences in adoption.
  • American Indian Adoptees is “a blog for and by American Indian and First Nations adoptees,” where past and current issues facing Native adoptees are brought forth.

If you need help finding ways for adoptees to connect, read each other’s stories and learn, check out some of these books by adoptees or other adoptee support options in addition to reading adoptee blogs.